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This question "Scholarly article on the percentage of vets who recommend spaying/neutering" really annoys me but I'm not sure if it's acceptable on this site or not.

The main question (among a lot of text) is:

All that is to ask: where can I find some definite, credible statistics on the percentage of vets that recommend spaying/neutering?

The problems I have with it are:

  • It's almost an exact copy of Scholarly article on health effects of spaying a dog but actually asks a different question, so strictly speaking it's not duplicate.
  • It asks about statistics about opinions (or where to find them), as opposed to opinions (which could be closed as opinion based).
  • It asks about statistics about the opinions of vets. It feels like it's much too broad, but on the other hand it "just" asks where to find statistics. I honestly doubt that such subjective opinions would ever be compiled into an objective and representative statistic, but that nobody's ever compiled a certain statistic is no reason to close the question as too broad.
  • Strictly speaking it asks about humans, not pets, but the humans it focuses on are vets ... It's by far not the first question about vets we answered here.
  • Even if we found a statistic, it wouldn't be of any real value. The number of vets who recommend spaying is as irrelevant as the number of people who believe the Earth is flat. What's relevant is whether or not spaying has positive and/or negative health effects, and that's exactly what the almost-duplicate asks about.

Our definition of what's on-topic is rather vague:

questions about items commonly associated with the care and housing of pets are on topic

I would like to ask for your opinion on what to do with such a question. Is in on topic? Why (or why not)?

  • It's almost an exact copy of Scholarly article on health effects of spaying a dog but actually asks a different question, so strictly speaking it's not duplicate. Would the answers of to the question still apply to the other? In that case it could probably be closed as a duplicate. – JAD Apr 16 at 7:09
  • @JAD The way both questions are formulated, they are not duplicate. The first asks for health effects of spaying and the second one asks how many vets recommend spaying. – Elmy Apr 16 at 7:46
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    @Elmy thanks for the posting the meta question. I have lived and watched TV in the US for decades, and there were often commercials "Dentists recommend BLAH" it is reasonable to assume that there maybe statistics about what Vets recommend, and that those recommendations could influence the care of pets. Should it be one or two questions? Is either a scope issue? I am interested to see what the community says. – James Jenkins Apr 16 at 10:58
  • i think this is a dangerous road to take,the risk is people do not take their pet to the vet when it is needed because the vet have the wrong opinion about one single detail. – trond hansen Apr 21 at 15:57

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