I wonder if these types of questions are good for this site. They don't directly have to do with pet care, or anything necessary to know in order to properly care for your pet. Will this type of question help this site progress?

The question that caught my attention was This: What species of wild rabbit is the domestic house rabbit decedent from?

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I'll preface this by stating that I basically agree with James, but I'd like to expand that concept a little bit. Reference a comment by Robert Cartaino on this answer to a legal question and in particular this statement: "This site should strive to become The Complete Compendium™ of all things pets."

To my mind a good compendium of all things pets should allow for some history information about the origin of various pet species. This is even more true if the goal is to clear up Internet misinformation about that. Ideally, our site becomes authoritative on many aspects of pets and their care.

Many SE sites allow history of their subject questions. History is an important to both pets and people, for instance the wide spread deaths attributed to the plague (Black Death) can be traced to a decrease in the cat population.

While these types of questions are listed in neither on-topic nor off-topic I see no reason not to include them.

P.S. I am the author of the example question.

  • I agree. The history of a domestic animal will tell you things about the habitat, the diet, the vulnerabilities and the habits of the animal while it was in the wild. While pet care is not about keeping an animal in 100% wild surroundings, to ignore that history - and thus the underlying nature of the animal - will inevitably hinder the proper care of it. – ClickRick Jul 6 '14 at 11:01
  • Also, while it is true that (for example) domestic cats now interact with each other in a very different way from the way they would have interacted even 1,000 years ago, that adaptation is all the more interesting by knowing how they used to be. – ClickRick Jul 6 '14 at 11:01

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .